UsAgainstAlzheimer's Blog

Stay up to date on the latest from UsAgainstAlzheimer's on our blog. Read about what our team is working on, the latest advancements in research, and what you can do to join the fight.

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February 23, 2021 - Greg O'Brien

A Case for FDA Approval: Biogen’s Aducanumab - First-Ever Drug to Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s

Time kills deals, as the saying goes. And the biggest deal on the Alzheimer’s front—in terms of improving cognition in the early stages of the disease—is Biogen’s new drug aducanumab, currently under review by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval. If approved, aducanumab would be the first-ever drug to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s and first-ever drug to treat mild cognitive impairment. Early-stage Alzheimer’s has not been afforded a new approved therapy in more than 17 years. No other major disease of Alzheimer’s scale and mortality has gone that long without incremental therapeutic relief. George Vradenburg, the UsAgainstAlzheimer’s
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January 13, 2021 - Kelly O'Brien

The Biden Administration Can Reinvigorate the National Fight Against Alzheimer’s

The Biden-Harris administration should renew and recommit to the national goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. This goal was set 10 years ago this month. It has spurred critical investments in research and interagency collaboration which have changed the trajectory of Alzheimer’s science and brought the movement to a new precipice of hope and opportunity. At the current pace, however, this effort will fall far short of the finish line in 2025. What is required is renewed energy, sharper focus, and greater urgency – starting within the White House. But first, a bit of history: The
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December 02, 2020 - Virginia Biggar

COVID-19 and Dementia: What People Have Learned about Themselves

The Alzheimer’s community has experienced enormous hardship and heartache since the COVID-19 pandemic started in March. Dementia caregivers are dealing with ongoing stress and people with Alzheimer’s report more rapid cognitive decline. Nursing home residents have been terribly affected by COVID-19 with rising cases and deaths, and restrictions on visitors meaning long separations from family. Throughout the last eight months, UsAgainstAlzheimer’s A-LIST has surveyed caregivers and people living with dementia on the impact of the pandemic, and learned about their stress, their isolation and their fears. But the surveys also have shown their insights and introspections. In a recent survey
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November 05, 2020 - Lynda Everman and Don Wendorf

Supporting Families Living with Dementia

November is both National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month and National Family Caregivers Month, and it offers an opportunity to recognize the efforts made to end Alzheimer’s and to acknowledge and support family caregivers. In our nation, 5.8 million people are living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia, and more than 16.1 million family caregivers will provide an estimated 18.6 billion hours of difficult, selfless, and unpaid care in 2020, with a financial value of $305 billion. The numbers, the sacrifices and the suffering are staggering. And so is the isolation that comes with this disease – an isolation and loneliness
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October 19, 2020 - Virginia Biggar

COVID-19 and Dementia: Lessons for the Next Pandemic

People with dementia and care partners are among those hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly Black and Latino families. A new UsAgainstAlzheimer’s A-LIST® survey shows ongoing closures and restrictions continue to seriously affect the memory and behaviors of those living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and cause enormous ongoing stress for caregivers. In our September A-LIST survey, we asked respondents, “What do you think your local, state and federal governments, and community-based groups, should be doing to help those living with dementia or mild cognitive impairment and their caregivers to prepare for the next pandemic?” Here are some of