Featured Stories

  • Lauren H. - A Granddaughter's Love

  • Lourieann W. - Our Many Firsts

  • Gary B. - My Story with Alzheimer's

  • Glenda K. - What Happened to the Woman I Knew as Mom?

  • Jana P. - Going, Going, Gone

  • Helen S. - He Would Want to be Counted

  • Tracey L. - Make Lemonade

  • Kim Y. - My Mom

  • Jay S. - My Mother's Story

  • Gary B. - Lost Identity

  • Darla M. - The Evil Witch in the Mirror

  • Robert F. - It's about My Dad

  • Allan S. - Onion Peels

  • Katherine C. - Whatever It Takes

  • Lisette C. - My Best Friend

  • Joyce H. - The Story of Edna P.

  • Max W. - From Child to Caregiver to Alzheimer's Researcher and Advocate

  • Enrique L. - U.S.M.C. Corporal

Your voice helps bring Alzheimer's out of the shadows.

Join our community of story tellers united in their determination to stop Alzheimer's! Share your personal story, a photo of a loved one, or a video telling us about your experience.

Together, we can show our leaders in Washington and beyond why we must make finding a cure for Alzheimer's a national priority!

People with Alzheimer's

July of 2012  I am 59 years old. I was told I have PCA a Visual Variant of Alzheimers. That I have between 8 to 12 years to live. Unlike regular Alzheimer's, the progress is much quicker, and mobility, balance and vison are affected to the point I should seek help from Services for the Blind. 

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People with Alzheimer's

I used to be a high functioning person. I had a high IQ, I went to law school at night while running a real estate joint venture between a regional developer and a regional financial institution and I still graduated in the top 25% if my class. I became a transactional real estate attorney working for companies that owned and/or leased real estate as part of their core business. A few years ago it started taking me longer to get my work done, I was less organized and had piles of paper on my desk. I got fired from 2 companies within 3 years.

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People with Alzheimer'sActivists

I would like to explain what it is like to experience a decline in your ability to think, remember and make decisions.  Early stage Alzheimer’s begins with episodes of memory lapse progressing to a diminished ability to reason and problem solve at a level achieved in the past.  As you re-evaluate what you now have control over, you must make adjustments in order to meet your needs via different pathways than you had previously.  Your choices are different and unfamiliar.  With fewer achievements and alternatives you are unable to meet your everyday needs.

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People with Alzheimer's

I used to be a high functioning person as a transactional real estate attorney. Now I can't work, in fact I was fired from my last two jobs. I started working at age 13 as a grunt maintenance man in a private park. My whole life has revolved around work and education. I even worked full time and went to law school at night. Up until about 4 years ago I was still working, but I got fired twice from my last two jobs, got diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's and now I can't work. I'm now 65 but I was probably 58 +/- when it started.

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People with Alzheimer's

It's a Wonderful Life is my favorite movie. Always has been. I love that George Bailey gets to see the impact he's had on so many people. I think it would be awesome for people to get to see that impact themselves. Hopefully it would show them that one person really can make a difference in someone else's life. I think I was around 10-12 years old when I first saw the movie. I remember thinking that George's mom would recognize him when nobody else did, but of course she didn't because he'd never been born (at that point in the movie).

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People with Alzheimer's

Although my intentions when I started this blog were to focus on running and working out, I feel a need to express my thoughts and feelings about the effects of Alzheimer's disease. I spend most of the time in denial and I keep thinking the tests (Pet Scan & Spec Scan) were wrong. But deep down I know they were correct. Most people associate a terminal disease with pain and suffering, or at least I do, so perhaps that is the reason I am in such denial. I have been through many phases over the last couple of years since my diagnosis. (continue reading here)

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People with Alzheimer'sActivists

Sharing my story is very difficult. You see, I am 51 years old and have Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. I watched my mother’s sisters die of it, one of them with early onset. My mother is in late stages now at age 80. I knew the signs and symptoms so I was lucky to be diagnosed so early. Or am I lucky. The emotional roller coaster I am on is one that I would be very happy to be off. Feeling myself slipping from day to day is horrible, frightening, and lonely.

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People with Alzheimer's

Me And My Alzheimer’s

Hello, this is my most recent account of how I first found out how I was suffering from Alzheimer’s (The early onset of) and how it has affected my day to day living and how its deteriorated since despite the help of some wonderful medics and medicine.

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People with Alzheimer's

My name is Michael Ellenbogen. I am a writer. I am a husband. I am a father. I was a high level manager. In 2008, at age 49, I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease after struggling to get a diagnosis since my first symptoms at age 39. I was always very successful in being able to accomplish anything I set my mind on doing. This diagnosis has changed my life in many ways. When I finally received my diagnosis of Alzheimer’s it was a relief to have an answer that explained the symptoms I was seeing in myself.

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People with Alzheimer'sActivists

About a month ago, someone posted on Memory People about their Dad wanting a dog. Not just a dog, but a dog that could help her Dad in his daily routine of things. I was not sure what all that entailed, but it got me thinking. Could there be such a thing?

A dog that could help a dementia patient? So, I started searching. Surfing the web. To my surprise there are hundreds of businesses that indeed have "service dogs". Dogs that are trained. Not just in obedience, but trained for special needs people. I had long known about seeing eye dogs, but this was different.

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People with Alzheimer'sActivists
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