Trish Vradenburg's blog

April 4, 2016 - Trish Vradenburg

In 1986, when my mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, I had no idea what it was — except that it was a disease and it was fatal. I knew no one who had it or, at the very least, talked about it. So I entered into the enigmatic maze of Alzheimer’s without a clue about how to navigate or what to expect was to come.

March 17, 2016 - Trish Vradenburg

In today's New Jersey Star-Ledger I argue for a third party - The Alzheimer's Party. Now we are neither Democrats nor Republicans. Now we are The Alzheimer's Party. Just as this disease is equal opportunity: Ds or Rs; rich or poor; male or female, African-American, Latino or white — we all are at risk. You can read my op-ed here.

January 19, 2016 - Trish Vradenburg

This post originally appeared on Huffington Post. ~ Trish

It started with lapses of memory. But who doesn't have those, right? It just means you have to concentrate a little more, be more focused and present in your life. At least that's what B. Smith thought at first.

December 21, 2015 - Trish Vradenburg

We end 2015 on an encouraging note in the fight against Alzheimer's. Congress has passed a bill to fund the government for the coming year providing an historic $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health. The increase means NIH will have additional money to support critical Alzheimer's-related research and, hopefully, move us closer to ending this devastating disease.

November 20, 2015 - Trish Vradenburg
May 7, 2015 - Trish Vradenburg

This post originally appeared on The Huffington Post. - Trish 

1987

My mother had once again refused to see a doctor. This from a woman who, until now, had been a hypochondriac.

All I wanted, I told her was, "A simple evaluation." 

"Evaluate yourself," she snapped, her determined chin jutting out.

"Mom, I'm not the one who thinks strange men are in the house."

April 22, 2015 - Trish Vradenburg

In 2009, at the age of 59, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's. It wasn't surprising since his family was laced with the disease: his grandfather, his uncle and his mother had all succumbed to this merciless killer. Now it's Greg O'Brien's turn. But he isn't going to go down without a fight.

February 9, 2015 - Trish Vradenburg

“Still Alice” is winning awards and critical acclaim for Julianne Moore’s moving portrayal of a woman with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The film’s popularity has great potential to raise awareness and understanding about Alzheimer’s—helping bring it out of the shadows, so more people understand its impact.

You can help by organizing a movie night. It’s a powerful subject, so the idea of going with a group may encourage more people to see it. Here’s how to get started:

December 15, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

This post originally appeared in the Alzheimer's Reading Room. - Trish 

It was 1978.  I had just settled down to catch an episode of “Happy Days,” a funny, sweet TV show – a good escape. 

In the episode, The Fonz (Henry Winkler) heard a knock at the Cunningham’s front door.  Outside stood Mork from Ork – Robin Williams in his first role. 

November 26, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

On Thanksgiving, George and I will enjoy a meal with family and share what we're thankful for this year.

But I want to get one in before we dig into the turkey and mashed potatoes. So thank you ... thank you for helping us grow UsAgainstAlzheimer's into a powerful machine to fight this senseless, cruel disease.

Pages

Comments

^ Back to Top