by2020

Written by Trish Vradenburg

and Special Guests

By 2020 Blog

December 15, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

This post originally appeared in the Alzheimer's Reading Room.

It was 1978.  I had just settled down to catch an episode of “Happy Days,” a funny, sweet TV show – a good escape. 

In the episode, The Fonz (Henry Winkler) heard a knock at the Cunningham’s front door.  Outside stood Mork from Ork – Robin Williams in his first role. 

November 26, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

On Thanksgiving, George and I will enjoy a meal with family and share what we're thankful for this year.

But I want to get one in before we dig into the turkey and mashed potatoes. So thank you ... thank you for helping us grow USAgainstAlzheimer's into a powerful machine to fight this senseless, cruel disease.

October 28, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

Ben Bradlee, the legendary editor of The Washington Post who was best known for exposing "Watergate," died last week.

October 1, 2014 - Allan S. Vann

(Adapted from remarks made at a hearing sponsored by Congressman Steve Israel, D-NY)

May 11, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

By Trish Vradenburg and Congresswoman Annie Kuster

On this Mother's Day, we honor our mothers, who suffered from a deadly and currently untreatable disease: Alzheimer's. 

Trish Vradenburg (TV): My Mother was larger than life. She embraced life with style and grace and passion. She could capture a room just by entering it.

April 30, 2014 - Howard C. and John C. Morgan

Editor's note, this post originally appeared on the blog A R E T E 

In Memory of Our Sister, Mary Ann Morgan, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.N.

April 18, 2014 - Dr. Richard Morgan

My books are like a ripple effect, taking me downstream to situations unknown. Recently, our book, “No Act of Love Is Ever Wasted: The Spirituality of Caring for Someone with Dementia” was read and used by Lynda Everman. Because of the book, Lynda contacted me about a new advocacy group open to all faith backgrounds, ClergyAgainstAlzheimer's, which I joined as a founder.

March 18, 2014 - Trish Vradenburg

If Alzheimer's were cured, people would simply age, rather than disappear into the unforgiving vortex of the disease. There are many octogenarians and nonagenarians who age as nature meant them to. Take for example:

March 13, 2014 - George Vradenburg

For Alzheimer's, the old Dickensian paradox holds: we are in the best of times and the worst.

Times are bad because there is no effective way to treat or prevent Alzheimer's, and global rates of the disease are going to double by 2030 and reach 135 million by mid-century. Families are financially and emotionally devastated by the disease, and national budgets are becoming overwhelmed by the disease's extraordinary costs.

February 25, 2014 - Steve Ponath

Editor’s note: This story is taken from a speech given recently by Steve at a church in North Carolina

Hello, my name is Steve Ponath

I am honored to of been asked to come before you today and speak about a disease that has affected me personally.  I'd like you to understand that in doing so, I step out of my comfort zone and walk in faith that what I am about to say is Christ centered, and not Steve centered. 

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