by2020

Written by Trish Vradenburg

and Special Guests

By 2020 Blog

November 13, 2013 - Martha Stettinius

Even with advanced dementia, my mother could feel moments of joy. I will always feel grateful that we gathered to celebrate her life not after she passed away, but while she was alive and could enjoy being the center of attention. 

My mother, Judy, told me years ago that when she passed away she wanted me to cremate her and to hold a “life celebration,” not a funeral—a party with family and friends. She pictured us at her lakeside home, reminiscing and laughing. We would spread her ashes on the waves, then talk and eat.

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October 29, 2013 - Allan S. Vann

Some of the most watched TV programs each year are NFL games and such large audiences give the NFL a tremendous opportunity to use its broadcasts for public service. To their credit, since 2009 the NFL has used October broadcasts to support breast cancer awareness and help raise money for research. Football players show their support by wearing pink on their uniforms and using pink equipment. Having lost my mother to cancer, and with relatives currently dealing with cancer, I applaud this NFL leadership role and enjoy seeing lots of pink on my TV screen this month.

October 23, 2013 - George Vradenburg

Editor's note: this blog post originally appeared on Huffington Post 50

October 18, 2013 - Trish Vradenburg

Editor's note: this blog post originally appeared on Huffington Post 50

Here is something that doesn't stop when the government closes down: Alzheimer's.

September 25, 2013 - Trish Vradenburg

Editor's note: This piece originally appeared on Huffington Post 50.

As a determined woman, activist, mother and writer, I've learned to stay humble (kids help you be that), work hard and to never take "no" for an answer.

It's been 26 years since my mom was first diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. This was the first time in my life that I had to accept "no, there is no cure" as the only answer available.

September 17, 2013 - George Vradenburg

Editor's note: This blog post originally appeared on The Huffington Post 

September 12, 2013 - Lora King

My Dad, Wince V. King, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in 2004 when he was 84 years old. This was four years after the death of his wife and my mother. They had been happily married for 58 years. Dad had been an athlete in high school and college; served in the army; a career fireman and Skycap with American Airlines; loved to exercise and attend church. He was a picture of a health.

September 6, 2013 - David Goldberg

Editor's note: this piece orginally appeared on David's personal blog

It is not every day that I walk out of a medical school lecture truly inspired.  The topic was on HIV and how far we have come in the treatment and management of the disease.  We’ve all heard how “HIV is no longer a death sentence,” but actually going through the details on how much success we’ve had in treating HIV is amazing.  

August 30, 2013 - George Vradenburg

Editor's Note: This blog post originally appeared on Huffington Post

Breaking news: Political leader delivers on promise.

August 13, 2013 - Marie Marley

Editor's note: This blog post originally appeared on Huffington Post

Yesterday afternoon, I walked into the spacious room belonging to Mary, a woman with dementia who has few visitors and with whom I've volunteered to spend a little time every week. I greeted her, complimented her on her beautiful turquoise sweater, and shook her hand.

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